About & Our Criteria

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Vocal Analyses

THE TEAM PAGE HERE

FUTURE ANALYSES HERE

This blog was made with the intent to share knowledge and share vocal analyses from different vocalists in K-pop. Nobody in the blog is a hater or an anti-fan. The analyses give positive and negative points and are all constructive criticism, nobody is telling you to hate or not listen to your favorite idol vocalist. We’re only letting you know what their vocal skill based on what vocal technique and music theory is from a musically professional standpoint. If you’re confused about rankings, categories and such, click the about and our criteria page. This post will also include the information existing in that page if you’re unwilling to click through just click read more. Otherwise click About & Our Criteria and most questions should be answered. We try to back up all our points with substantial evidence from the singers’ performances, we thoroughly listen to their performances from past and present. No one in this blog claims to be an all knowing expert, we’re all learning and everyday we learn more and more, just as we respect your opinions, please respect ours, which were influenced by the knowledge we have and the way we’ve been taught. We encourage healthy discussions about technique! Thank you.

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This blog is dedicated to compile vocal analyses done by our contributors in order to satisfy everyone’s curiosity regarding their idols’ vocal. The analysis will be based solely on VOCAL TECHNIQUE, not tone, timbre, emotions, stage presence, etc.

The analysis might change according to their latest performance.

If you would like your idol to be analyzed feel free to drop the question in the comment box. If you feel that the analysis is not accurate, you could suggest a video or recording and give us the reasoning behind your disagreement. We will gladly alter the vocal analysis page of the respective idol if your reasoning behind it is proven.

Comments will be moderated. Constructive discussions are welcome. Bashful and hateful comments will be deleted. Every idol mentioned here is talented in their own way. Even so, we are focusing solely on their vocal capabilities and we try our best to give an objective analysis regarding the matters.

So far, we will use this system as our judging criteria. We will elaborate more once it’s established. It goes from best to worst.

TERMINOLOGY

Tones/Semitones/Notes/Key
A key of a song means within the key signature of the song. There are 12 notes in total, C C#/Db D D#/Eb E F F#/Gb G G#/Ab A A#/Bb B and back to C, completing one full octave. A tone is from a note up two semitones, so the distance between C and C#/Db is a semitone, whereas C and D are a full note apart. A major Key will follow a tone tone semitone tone tone tone semitone pattern, so C major is C D E F G A B C. Although there are no sharps or flats between E and F or B and C, they’re a semitone apart. # stands for sharp and b stands for flat and whether or not you name a note sharp or flat depends on the key, i.e. C# major and Db major are the same key with different names, C# D# E# F# G# A# B# C# and Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C Db, on a piano the same notes are played, just with different names.

Intonation
Being able to stay in pitch and in key. Good intonation means not going sharp, flat or singing a note that isn’t within the chord progression and/or key of the song. Going sharp means slightly above the pitch but not really hitting a note above, so like a note in between C and C#, and flat means a note that’s slightly below pitch, so a note in between C and B, for example.

Larynx Position/High Larynx/Low Larynx/Neutral Larynx
The larynx is the part of the body where the vocal cords are located. The vocal cords are very small and are divided into two parts that vibrate against one another in order to create sound. The speed of the vibration generally determines the pitch someone sings in. Much like tuning a guitar, the more stretched the vocal cords are and thinner they become, the higher the pitch and the thicker they are, the lower the pitch is. In order for a note to be hit, one should have a relaxed opened sound in the larynx, without any restrictions from the throat muscles. If the larynx is pushed down, it creates a froggy and fake “soulful” tone, if it’s pulled up, it creates a thinner, squeezed and tight quality to the voice. The natural state of the larynx is being neutral when it’s relaxed, if it’s forced either up or down, that means the muscles in the throat are creating tension and the larynx is trying to reposition itself in an uncomfortable and unnatural position to hit notes that are not within the individual’s supported range. 

Tonality/Tone Production
The way tone and sound is produced through good support. The voice comes out stable, without any laryngeal restriction nor tension, tone is clean and has the true sound of the individual’s voice type, without an uncentered pitch, excessive breathiness, nasality and tension.

Vibrato
The shift between two notes rapidly within, normally, a sustained note. The difference between the notes is usually less than a semitone. A forced throaty vibrato is usually produced artificially by using the throat, instead of the natural vibrato that comes out once the vocal cords are relaxed with good breath support.

Stability
The stability of the voice, meaning it’s not off pitch and it doesn’t sound wobbly, shaky and unsupported.

Registers
Chest voice, lowest range. Head voice, highest range. Mixed voice, the belting area of the voice.

Support
How the individual vocalist uses their correct breathing technique with the diaphragm to better support, project and hold their voice together.

Placement vs Resonance vs Projection
Resonance is the optimum sound a vocalist should focus on when singing. It is a full, clean and round sound that won’t sound thin, constricted or small. A vocalist who’s resonant will use different types of placements, i.e. their voice will be placed either in their chest, head or mask (cheekbones area, not nose) to project their voice, in each individual register. A vocalist may be able to be resonant in their mixed voice by normally placing their voice in their mask with chest resonance, or as they go higher, with head resonance. A resonant sound is always going to be a projected sound, now resonance doesn’t mean loud, because a loud sound may still be pushed and strained. You may project but still have tension, but in true resonance tension should not be present. Resonance is produced when the vocalist is able to support their voice. In other words, they have developed vocal cords that are able to connect fully in a healthy manner, without breathiness coming between them nor too much constriction, against the right amount of air pressure. Then the supported sound is enhanced with the proper placement of sound, while keeping the soft palate lifted, the larynx position not high, the swallowing muscles, jaw, tongue And throat relaxed and the jaw dropped so as to amplify the sound of the voice. The combination of an open throat, support, relaxed singing and proper placement is what creates healthy resonance in singing.

Vocal Range vs Supported Range vs Tessitura
Vocal range means the individual’s lowest singable note to the individual’s highest singable note.  A tessitura will depend on the individual’s voice type and where their voice sits most comfortably, shines the most and could project the best. A supported range includes notes outside the tessitura where the individual’s voice type may not be naturally inclined to project well in, however so due to the vocalist’s own ability, they’re able to still maintain tone production, support, projection and stability. e.g In classical music, sopranos’ tessituras are something in between A3/C4 to  A5/C6, however in contemporary music a soprano singing as high as C6 is very uncommon and unnecessary; a contemporary soprano, for an example Luna, is able to keep resonance consistently up until Eb5, which is almost ideal for a soprano who should be able to carry that resonance up until A5 without a problem. However so she’s also able to sing down to G3 with correct support, which although is outside her voice type’s natural tessitura, she’s still able to keep support and projection down there.

Musicianship/Musicality
Musicianship is the act of changing any song given to you and making it your own, usually on the spot. This includes melodic changes, rhythmic changes and added embellishments. Musicality is the act of interpreting music correctly according to each individual genre of music, by adding the correct use of vocal effects (e.g. raspiness, breathiness, growls, vocal runs, vibrato) and playing with the song musically by adding dynamics (e.g. singing softly, loudly, powerfully on the right moments of each song).

Passaggi/Vocal Bridges
A passaggio or a vocal bridge is an area of the voice where one’s voices transition naturally from one to the other in the modal register. Usually for males, the distance between the first passaggio, from chest voice to mixed voice, and the second passaggio, from mixed voice to head voice, is only about a 4th apart, whereas for females it’s about an octave apart. Passaggi are important for one to be able to tell what someone’s voice type is. A register break or the highest note you can sing in your chest/mixed voice before transitioning into head voice is NOT your first passaggio. The first passaggio is a note in your range where your voice naturally feels a switch of muscle coordination in your vocal cords. That doesn’t mean you can’t bring a chest dominant or balanced mixed voice above your first or even second passaggio. Lyric tenors usually have their passaggi around D4/Eb4 and G4/Ab4, whereas lyric baritones have their passaggi at B3 and E4. Lyric sopranos are usually at F4/F#4 and F5/F#5.

Legato/Staccato
A musical phrase usually will last a couple of bars. During a phrase, the melody may be played/sung smoothly connected without every note sounding chopped up, whereas staccato means emphasizing every single note separately with minor less than a second breaks in between every note. Legato is the most basic form of singing through correct breath control and support.

Agility
Vocal agility is an embellishment and it means, being able to sing many notes accurately and quickly, by separating each individual note while still being able to connect them within one sung vowel. Those are usually called melismas or vocal runs.

CRITERIA

The new labels on the blog will classify vocalists and label them within their own stylistic choices, vocal register development, supported ranges and where their strengths lie. This isn’t to say anybody is better than anybody. This will merely classify them within their own styles. A vocalist may fit into more than one category at a time.

MH Vocalists: Mid-Range Head Voice Vocalists

Vocalists in this category haven’t developed their head voices very high but are able to use them within a relatively low to mid range in their voice type’s tessitura. They maintain connection at will and are able to access their head voices at will.

Sopranos: Up to at least D5 up to G5/G#5
Mezzo-Sopranos: Up to at least C5 up to F5/F#5
Tenors: Up to at least A4 up to D5/Eb5
Baritones: Up to at least F4 up to Bb4/B4

HV Vocalists: High Head Voice Vocalists

Vocalists in this category have developed a relaxed and open sound in their head voices. They can manipulate dynamics, qualities within their head voices, they maintain supported qualities and manipulate the placement in their head voices well.

Sopranos: Starting Around A5
Mezzo-Sopranos: Starting around G5
Tenors: Starting around E5
Baritones: Starting around C5

MB Vocalists: Mid-Range Belters

Vocalists within this category generally perform the best within their mid-belting mixed voice range. Once they go high, they might have issues with keeping their throats as opened as they were in their mid belting ranges. They must be able to produce resonance in their mixed voices to be classified in this category.

Sopranos: Up to at least C5 up to D5/Eb5
Mezzo-Sopranos: Up to at least Bb4 up to C5/C#5
Tenors: Up to at least G4 up to A4
Baritones: Up to at least Eb4 up to F4

HB Vocalists: High Range Belters

Vocalists in this category perform best and have the most ease within their upper mixed voice ranges. They are able to keep an opened sound without losing tone quality, without losing support and without losing volume while still being relaxed. They must be able to produce resonance in their mixed voices to be classified in this category.

Sopranos: Starting around E5
Mezzo-Sopranos: Starting around D5
Tenors: Starting around Bb4
Baritones: Starting around F#4

M Vocalists: Mid-Range Vocalists

Vocalists in this category are those with relatively narrow supported ranges, whose strengths lie in singing within an octave of their range without going too high or too low too often. They generally keep support within a mid one octave range, but outside of that strain can become more apparent and intense.

Sopranos: Falling somewhere within A3/Bb3 ~ Bb4/B4
Mezzo-Sopranos: Falling somewhere within G3/G#3 ~ G#4/A4
Tenors: Falling somewhere within E3 ~ F4/F#4
Baritones: Falling somewhere within C3 ~ C#4/D4

ML Vocalists: Mid-Low Range Vocalists

Vocalists in this category have somewhat developed their lower ranges, but could still further develop the strength in the vocal cord development, projection, support and connection as they descend lower in range.

Sopranos: Going down to about G#3/G3
Mezzo-Sopranos: Going down to about F#3/F3
Tenors: Going down to about C#3/C3
Baritones: Going down to about A2/G#2

LR Vocalists: Low Range Vocalists

Vocalists in this category generally develop their lower ranges well and are comfortable singing lower than most within their voice types. They have developed chest voices, sung without tension, with connection, projection and ease.

Sopranos: Anywhere starting on F#3 and below
Mezzo-Sopranos: Anywhere starting on E3 and below
Tenors: Anywhere starting on B2 and below
Baritones: Anywhere starting on G2 and below

S vocalists: Stylistic Vocalists

Vocalists within this category usually prefer to sing in a specific specialized generally breathy way, narrowing their genre to keep themselves true to their style. They can often prefer breathiness, soft singing, throatiness and falsetto over singing with more connection and belting with more openness/roundness in tone.

C Vocalists: Commercial Vocalists

Vocalists in this category lack in terms of clarity of tone and overall management of airflow. They don’t necessarily prefer stylistic qualities like breathiness or soft singing. Instead they prefer to sing in a way that’s specific to their own music only, preferring to sing with high larynxes, or more air pressure, etc.

MA Vocalists: Melismatic/Agile Vocalists

This category is exclusive for the vocalists who have learned to how to properly move their vocal cords from note to note, at the center of pitch, with precision, control and ease. They have flexible vocal cords that respond to changes in pitch without sliding through them, but instead hitting each single note at a time with accuracy.

WR vocalists: Well Rounded Vocalists

Vocalists in this category have developed their ranges to sing within a variety of genres and styles while keeping a strong connection between their vocal cords and air management to sing with minimal strain within a wider range, from chest voice to mixed voice to head voice. The development of each of those registers should be both consistent and balanced.

For further question you can check our “The Team” page and contact us directly if you’d like.

Regards,

Ahmin & Pandayeu

FUTURE ANALYSES HERE

THE TEAM PAGE HERE

10,866 thoughts on “About & Our Criteria

    1. No, not at all. It’s actually quite strained, there is a lot of throat tension on that note. Understandably so, it’s a man singing a D5.

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      1. Perhaps it’s one of your first times. So please do provide time stamps even on a different video. Just in case. Also if you’re familiar with the blog and our analyses, the number of male vocalists who can support D5’s can be counted on the fingers of one hand, and the number of times they did it too. Tenors resonating D5’s, much less supporting them, are quite rare. This is less strained but it’s still strained and it doesn’t truly carry support. The notes prior were quite nice though. He phrased supported A4’s and Bb4’s, and sustained a resonant A4, which I find much more impressive than the strained D5.

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      2. I love this Blog!
        I think the best for improve is learning from the best!! when I do some exercises then record my self and then I go to this blog that the analysis it’s very accurate and I try to improve watching and learning. I really loved what you share, I’m going to combine it with what I’m doing [ https://bit.ly/2TyV6ea ] to improve my singing.

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    1. I noticed that a D3 was never in any range for a tenor, so I wanted to ask about that. That’s why I wrote my comment like that.

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    2. I think the way to phrase the question would be: “What is the equivalent soprano note for a tenor’s D3?” and I’m confused by what you mean with “D3 was never in any range for a tenor.” But D3 in a tenor’s voice would theoretically probably feel like a soprano’s G3 or so. That can be quite arguable.

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      1. Hi Ahmin! I’m new here and I was wondering, even though Little Mix are not kpop idols, do any of them have good technique? I’m pretty sure Jade and Perrie are the best vocalists (maybe I’m wrong though) and they are pretty decent within the 4th octave, however overall how do you think they are?

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      2. I’m sorry but since this is a K-pop blog and we focus solely on them, especially considering more than 120 vocalists have been analyzed, we honestly don’t follow many other artists. I don’t know them well enough to say anything conclusive, I apologize.

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      3. By “D3 was never in any range for a tenor,” I meant that it was skipped when you wrote the new ranges for the new system. I saw that for the “Mid-Range Vocalist” category, a tenor’s range would fall in between E3~F4/F#5, and for the “Mid-Low Range Vocalist” category, a tenor would have to go down to a supported C#3/C3. To me, at least, that meant that you skipped D3, and Eb3 for that matter. That’s why I thought D3 was never in a tenor range.

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      4. So it’s possible for a mid-range tenor vocalist’s supported range to go down to D3, like Jun.K from 2PM?

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  1. I’d also like to ask — even though Rosé won’t be analysed til next year, since as of right now she supports aprox one octave, would you categorise her as “Mid-Range Vocalist” or is she a few notes off?

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    1. I’m not Ahmin, but I guess I’ll respond (although late, lol) but a vocalist would have to have solid breath support in that octave of their range to qualify for the mid-range category. I think Rose is still somewhat inconsistent with support. She still sings with her “signature style” as far as I can hear, and that’s what causes most of her issues. If she received the proper training she needed, or if she willingly chooses to improve on her own, getting rid of her bad habits and her singing style would do wonders. She unintentionally makes singing harder for herself, and is probably unaware of it as well. Unfortunate to say, but she’s still not quite a stellar vocalist. She’s improved a tiny bit in several areas since debut, but not massively. Who knows though, anyone can improve, so we could always see something like that from her. Who knows, she might pull a Hyorin one with vocal improvements, lol.

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      1. Also, she still struggles with nasality and opening up her throat more. Her singing still sounds closed off at times, and I still hear some tension in her singing every now and then. If I were to give her a supported range, it’d probably be A3/Bb3 to G#4/A4, even if it’s not fully controlled.

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      2. Thanks for the answer! Yeah, I was holding on to a bit of hope but I didn’t expect her to be mid-range anyways. Hopefully she improves though.

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    1. We don’t use the ratings anymore so I’m not sure why you’re using them. Heize was originally a rapper so it’s understandable why she’s got underdeveloped mixing and support.

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    1. Oh someone made a vocal range video for him??? That’s so nice! I’ll definitely use it when I do get to analyze him but I’d really rather not give him a supported range yet based off of this video.

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    1. I’m going to be very honest and say it’s very shallow. 0:54 onward like when he was phrasing more lightly, there’s a degree of shallow support and it’s better than the high notes because I’ve pointed out many times I’m more interested in a vocalist supporting. Not their high notes. If a vocalist can’t support consistently, a high note isn’t going to be supported period. For example, 1:32 G4’s and he usually places the sound inward before pushing it forward with like a shouty push of air pressure. 2:21 Even this E4 is not very well supported, he is still pushing from the throat, it’s shallow but it isn’t nasal. It’s just very in his throat with a lighter mix so it masks away the strain.

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    1. I am so sorry but without analyzing him I can’t give you an answer, but what I can say is that also for me to have an idea of a vocalist’s supported range, they must first support consistently. And I’m not sure I’ve heard him do that.

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  2. What are the requirements for a vocalist to not be classified as a Mid-Range vocalist? Do they have to fit into the criteria for Mid-Range belters or? Bc I’ve seen ppl being classified as Mid-Range vocalists here even though they had more than one octave of supported range (without head voice), so I was wondering how you did the classifying there. Also, would a soprano w a supported range of about E3-A4-Eb5 be classified as Mid-Range vocalist too or would the supported range be too wide?

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    1. I’m not an admin, but to answer your second question, I think a soprano with a supported range of E3-A4-Eb5 would not be classified as a mid-range vocalist. That range is definitely wider than the requirement for that specific category.

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    2. If they don’t fit any other criteria, they can only be called mid-range vocalists. Mid-range vocalists are vocalists with about an octave of supported range, but it’s used usually for vocalists when referring to their mixed voice. It’s possible one is a mid-range vocalist with a developed head voice and/or lower range. But if their mix is not developed, they don’t have an extensive supported range in mixed voice and are not able to produce resonance consistently, they can’t be mid-range belters. I suppose the example you have would be a mid-range vocalists, mid range head voice vocalist and a low range vocalist, although I’ve never really encountered such a case thus far.

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      1. So if a vocalist is not a Mid-Range Belter or a High Range Belter, they’d automatically be classified as a Mid-Range vocalist, no matter the development of the other registers?

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  3. This is the main vocalist (Jongho) of a group called Ateez that debuted recently. May I know if there is anything noteworthy of the part where he sings @ 7:39-7:49 ???

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      1. I hope this one works. Sorry for the hassle btw, I didn’t know Korea blocked so many videos. He sings between 7:39-7:49.

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      2. His voice is pretty subjectively speaking. It’s light, it doesn’t carry very full support and he is pushing from his throat more than he needs to, but there’s a degree of support behind it.

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      3. Oh, it’s better than I expected :O I’m glad he has some support (even if it’s shallow), he definitely has potential. Also, thank you for answering me!

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    1. Not the admin, but I can answer. It should be Jung Dongha. With consistent support and resonance up to Bb4/B4 in mixed voice, and even able to support his head voice up to A5, it’s basically a no brainer. Both Naul and Park Hyoshin come close, tho.

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  4. Hi Armin Can you help me check my voice please?

    you help me for once in opera song haha.
    and i use you video to practice my head voice a lot.
    what do you think about the notes F5 G5 and A5 Support? or resonance or not? thank you so much. 😀

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    1. This is 6 months old. In order for one to produce a sound that carries resonance, one must first be relaxed and have openness, with proper placement while supporting. So let’s focus on support first. For a male, you being able to sing G5 and A5 as softly as you did is not easy. But there’s tightness in the throat, there is pushing of air, there’s an H sound before the vocal cords actually connect to the vowel you’re singing and there’s squeezing as you get higher. It’s not easy to sing that high well. You should focus on developing support from a lower range before going right into F5.

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      1. Thank you so much. I keep doing!!
        I never know am supported F5 before haha
        But because of you and your video make me want to davelope my voice. Can i have a chance to support that A5? Anyway than you again.💗💗💗

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      2. No no I didn’t say that you supported F5, please don’t misunderstand. Of course you can support A5, but like I said you need to start from lower notes first.

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  5. Would you say Red Velvet as a whole is a strong group in terms of harmonising?
    (particularly interested in the ones @0:27-1:00 and @1:10-1:24 and @1:55-2:22)

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      1. It’s not a four part harmony. I don’t think it’s even 3 parts, I can hear maybe a 2 part harmony but it’s hard to hear the other part. This isn’t 100% live, so it’s been tweaked. I’m not sure, I mostly hear unison.

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    1. Sometimes I’d say their blending could be a bit better and their parts aren’t 100% right all the time, but some of these seem kind of unrehearsed, so it’s okay. They’re on the good side.

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      1. Oh nice! Their harmonies always stood out to me (in a good way) and I’m happy they’re all able to hold their own without too many problems.

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      2. Okay, this is the last question I’ll ask for now because I don’t want to bother you too much since you have probably 2000 more things to do.

        What are the notes (in the “Would U” video) that Irene and Seulgi hit @1:40-1:41? Is that a harmony, and octave unison or simply 2 notes that coincidentally sound well together?

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      3. I mean it’s kind of an octave unison. I wouldn’t call what Irene is doing singing since she’s kind of half speaking on notes, as a rap. But she did speak around Eb4, and Seulgi hit Eb5.

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  6. Hey ahmin
    What do you think about this singer kim kyung hyun? (former member of The Cross apparently) for me he starts becoming very shouty and strained very early but everyone keeps on talking about how “good” he is so i wanted an opinion from a professional 🙂 thanks

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    1. I haven’t really been answering questions that aren’t specific, but you did share your own thoughts briefly and I appreciate that. 0:20 He breathed into his chest, he is not using his diaphragm enough. 1:20 Around G4, I hear a lot of shallowness, placement in the throat and pushing already there. So I agree with you. I think listening to “everyone” is always a dangerous thing to do. Because “everyone” says a lot of stuff and that’s why one must filter through it all. Trust your own ears, don’t worry about others and no need to argue with them either. Let them be, unless they want to learn more.

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    1. I found your old recording. You’re pushing somewhat less, but the support hasn’t stuck in yet. You need to keep practicing to use less of your throat, as little of it as possible.

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      1. Thanks for replying. Can I ask two questions more?
        Does I have breath support? Is my placement put at the mask even a little bit?

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      2. Your placement is a bit more towards the mask, yes and there’s a better grasp of what it is like to support, but it’s not there yet.

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  7. Is it possible that stress-induced neck tension affects my singing? Like, I don’t even know what a relaxed throat feels like, I’m basically always tense and stiff in my neck and shoulder area.

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      1. Oh that’s bitter :-/ I already tried so many things over the last 5 years — physiotherapy, sport, meditation, yoga, pmr and what not. I’m a mess lol. Thanks for the reply! 🙂 I’ll definitely continue working on it!

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    1. I’ve been adapting! Have you been good? The belts are definitely a lot less pushed. You’re still doing some of the things you usually do for the rest of your range, your aye vowels still become more pushed than others but overall the higher notes are a lot less pushed. You don’t read Korean, do you? You’re reading the romanized Korean lyrics when you sing, right? It really affects your diction, your vowels in Korean aren’t precise which is why I say, don’t sing in a language you don’t speak.

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      1. Oof yeah. I’ll definitely keep that in mind…again lol. I’ve been great! Hopefully I’ll get a keyboard this year so I can actually practice music too.
        Though I’m less pushed, am I still not supporting yet? It feels different when I sing now because I get pretty open and projected (I guess) when I approach the Bb3-C#4/D4 area and I wonder if it’s far from carrying proper support.

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  8. First of all I just want to say Ahmin’s active again! I mean you have always been active but I hope you have been doing wonderful the past months with your transition and projects.

    And since you’re back I hope I can ask for some help with my vocal. So here’s my latest effort to learning to support, I sing the same song in two different keys:

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1NFQmbgF0JhvrpmkYTf3D2jNChfQvIwgZ in key B
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1O7mirgQFZ1nQc6yIAlexXRDaGp9v4tjL in key Bb

    Can you give me some remarks? I was singing at 12am so I don’t want my roommate to knock on my door to tell me to shut up lol, so I can feel that both are a bit shaky, but I don’t know if I’m supporting correctly or not. I definitely pushed above D4, but I’m not sure if I sound relaxed on D4/Eb4. And also I feel very unsure about my second octave, I feel like I lowered my larynx at A2.

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    1. Hi dear! I was never gone or inactive haha I just didn’t feel the need to respond to many questions here since other people could do it. “girl” “have” “don’t let them know” “well” “know” “go” “anymore” “door” “on.” I’d say you’re supporting actually throughout the verse! I was very pleasantly surprised, the only problem is that you carry throat tension which comes from your accent in English closing your throat when you sing those vowels I highlighted in those words. Mostly Oh, Uh, or anything with an L. Careful with the lower notes in general, don’t let them be swallowed back, but they weren’t bad. Good job! Actually really good job!

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      1. Thank you so much, I’m so happy right now. And do you think I’m supporting in the chorus? Especially the D4/Eb4/E4 range.

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    1. These exercises are good but you need to make sure you’re doing them right. About your singing in general, it was a day after your last recording, I can’t say there’s going to be much of a difference when you’re doing this by yourself.

      Like

    1. There’s no C#5 at 1:38, but she hits a few C#5’s throughout. Those notes are light and on closed vowels, they don’t need to cut through. They’re not strained, but they’re closed due to the vowel. They have support but also tension.

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    1. The 3:47 C#6/D6 to me sounds pushed, not fully supported. 3:41 Bb5 that drops to a note in between A5 and Bb5 has good placement and support, she may just be tired with that one. The C#6 for me is questionable because this is so old, back when Sohyang still did have tension around those notes like above G5, so it’s hard for me to say they’re supported.

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      1. I’m not sure you understand what dubbing means. Dubbing has no influence on supporting notes because dubbing isn’t…a mic effect. Dubbing is re-recording the performance afterwards and replacing the audio of the televised version so that when it’s aired, you have a better audio to match up with the video and make the live performance seem like it was better than it was.

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      2. I mean in the video broadcasting on TV, she sings on pitch so I think it is edited to pull her note up to Bb5. And it sounds resonant.
        So, mic effect can have influence on supporting notes?

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      3. Editing and dubbing are different things. Mic effect? No mic effects like editing the audio can fool people into thinking a vocalist’s singing is louder, fuller, more projected and more pitch centered.

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  9. Hey guys, maybe an odd question but is it possible for a vocal student to surpass his or her teacher even if such student has only ever received lessons from that teacher? is there a chance for them to develop their vocal registers further than their teacher?

    Like

  10. Hi Ahmin, after you recommend me to focus support from the low note. I practice a lot
    And I can feel comfortable around A4 to D5 but I sang up to F5 and still comfortable but I not sure that F5 was supported or not. what do you think about my head voice now. Do I support any notes? we can support note with tension and air pushed? Support mend connect right? Thank you so much.
    Listen to Head voice practice. by jean ja #np on #SoundCloud

    Like

    1. I’m not sure that’s something that has to do with singing habits. It could be a medical thing, I’m not sure. I’d have to hear you and see you to know what you’re doing. Your diet may also influence this.

      Like

  11. Hi, I watched your “how to use a head voice” video and you said that, to produce head voice, your [———–] and [———-] muscles had to be used properly. I couldn’t understand it properly, which muscles are they?
    Also, I assume a person’s mix utilises different supporting muscles and so does their chest voice, may I know which ones they are?

    Like

    1. Cricothyroid and thyroarytenoid muscles were the ones I was referring to. They’re often referred to as CT and TA muscles in singing context. Supporting muscles? What do you mean by that?

      Like

      1. Oh yeah those are the ones. I was referring to which muscles engaged in the chest and mixed registers, however I found out it was also the CT and TA.
        So is the CT the dominant muscle in the upper register, the AT in the chest voice, and an equal dominance of both in the mix? Whenever I read an explanation of head voice, chest voice, etc., I always see “it’s used to describe the feeling of resonant sound in the head/chest/…” However I’m also interested in understanding the way the muscles and vocal cords work in each register.

        Like

      2. Yup, gotcha. Also this is kinda unrelated, but is there somewhere I can go to to learn what each note sounds like consistently with a human voice? I’m slowly starting to learn how to tell strain, throat, jaw, etc. tension and proper support however since I can’t tell notes apart it’s really incomplete knowledge. All I find are videos that show me notes on a piano but since it’s not a human voice, I have a hard time matching the notes (idk if you understand what I mean).

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      3. I mean have you tried vocal range videos? But notes in a human voice will never sound the same because we all have different voices.

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    1. Someone asked about it. “Chuu generally supports, that’s something I have felt a few times. 0:28 Eb3, before that G#3. She drops her support a lot in the third octave and has no developed chest voice. Her mix has some drops in support as well, flatness at 0:55 and she just isn’t lifting her soft palate enough. But she is actually connecting better in the chorus. She has support, to an extent.”

      Like

    1. Why are you asking questions like a day later? Without even practicing the way I’ve suggested, I’m not sure why you’re asking whether you support or not. Have you been doing any vocal exercises that actually address support? Have you been recording yourself and listening back to hear the difference? You can’t just sing songs and hope improvement happens, you have to be self critical and detailed.

      Like

  12. Hi ahmin can you quickly analyze this short clip of me singing? I believe the range in this specific clip is D4~G4 with an F4 sustained at the end. Any tips on getting better etc?

    Like

    1. Have you ever asked about your own singing before? I know you’ve asked a lot of questions about other singers. I think there’s less shallow support than not. It’s connected, it’s clean, you’re not nasal, you place your sound. But you push, a lot. You’re using air pressure over almost everything else. Your pitch is good, you have a very pretty voice, your diction is good. Just don’t try to push out notes so much, you don’t need to.

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      1. Thank you so much! Yeah I’ve actually never asked about my singing before and I would actually like to know is it mask placed or chest placed? Oo okay thanks for informing me of the pushing. But just more question.. by less pushing, you mean same placement but more relaxed into it at a lesser volume and without leaking air right? Also I have yet to determine my voice type. I know this is really not enough for you to tell me my voice type so hopefully I’ll send in more clips with lower notes and head voice. Once again thanks I really appreciate you taking time out of your busy schedule.😊

        Like

      2. It’s a combination of mask and chest. You’re not leaking air, you’re just compressing the vocal cords against exaggerated air pressure. But yes the placement and everything else can stay, just don’t kind of shout out the notes so much. I’m not sure what your voice type is either actually. I wanna say it’s higher than mine but I could be wrong.

        Like

  13. I was watching IZ*ONE on a variety show and they were playing the Cleopatra game. What really surprised me was how low the main vocalist Jo Yuri went! It sounded really low. Even though its speaking so it’s not exactly on pitch or anything, what’s the approximate lowest note she hit?

    Timestamp – 0:39

    Like

    1. She did not go that low. She just lowered her larynx and projected with that, so she sounded thick. But it was E3 and F3, at the lowest. She didn’t sing anything uncommonly low.

      Like

      1. From what you’ve heard (if you’ve heard anything apart from that video), would you say Yuri has decent technique, or that she shows proper support?

        Like

  14. So I have a question. Whenever I sing, my throat/neck area vibrates the same way as if I’m talking. I assume that’s normal since it’s where the vocal cords are located? Or is that considered throat tension? I’ve read a lot of people saying that to reduce throat tension you need to rely less on singing with your throat, but how, if my vocal cords are there?

    Like

  15. Hey it’s me again! So here’s another clip of me singing but with lower notes in the second. Any comments on them about connection, larynx position, projection etc?Along with that I also tried to mix with less pushing. Thoughts? Not much HV in here but is my voice type a bit more apparent now?

    Like

    1. Oh you support naturally very well! Your lower notes are very well approached mostly too. Your transitions aren’t bad, you felt the phlegm in your throat and you stopped it. You have a very nice and natural ability for singing. You seem not used to not pushing though, right? You seem like a baritone to me.

      Like

      1. Wow I actually support. I actually tend to push when I’m very uncomfortable with my technique or not being “sure” whether I’m doing everything right as I’ve never had vocal lessons before. I usually can make quick changes in my voice this way as I learnt to keep tongue and throat tensions/excess airiness away since I started to learn about singing myself with proper technique which was about a year ago. It’s just the pushing that comes in at times but after your analysis, I am very grateful that I’ve found the root cause of my inconsistencies and have started to learn to control that pushing. I also take inspiration from vocalists like Ailee, Michael bublé, Beyoncé, D.O etc. Yes I just woke up before recording this and there was a bit of phlegm present lol. I always thought of myself as a baritone but never tried to be too sure and just sang in a comfortable range mainly even though I really doubted myself being a tenor looking at Baekhyun who literally speaks G4s compared to me. From this video, can you tell which notes were supported? I’ll be sending in some head voice clips next so you can have a look if you have time of course. Thanks so much though for this, it feels as if my I’m much sure with my singing now. Everything with my vocal folds just feels healthier now.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Id rather you not worry about a supported range yet cause most of what you sing carries support except when it’s around G4, for now. Just focus on not pushing.

        Like

  16. Do singers of a higher skill level have more volume output than singers who are of a lower skill level?
    Regardless of voice type/fach that it?
    For example, would vocalists such as Sohyang,Whitney Houston,Mariah Carey,Aretha,Natalie Weiss have more output than vocalists like Ailee,Son Seungyeon,Shannon, Lee Haeri,Ann One,Lena Park,Ock Joohyun?As well as male vocalists(Ex. Park Hyoshin,Naul vs. Ryeowook,Chen)

    Like

    1. I did not see this question at all. Do singers with a higher level of skill produce a sound with more volume output? Not necessarily, but it’s likely they would. It really depends how they sing. Chestiness is definitely louder than headiness, so even if a vocalist is yelling, if they’re chesty, they’ll most likely be louder than a heady healthier vocalist. The level of skill of the vocalists you’re comparing is fairly close, so many factors like the range they’re singing in, the vowel they’re using, etc., would affect the end result.

      Like

    1. I’m going to be honest with you. I have not been answering questions that are generic, with no time stamps, without mentioning the name of the singer and without providing context and your own attempts to get to an answer yourself. (Like your past questions) For those questions, I’ve been letting other users answer them. ESPECIALLY a video like this where the part you’re asking about starts at 2:41 and onward and you didn’t even provide that information in your comment. 뚜두뚜두 is hardly a vocal song, so to really expect vocals from this song that has a lot of rapping is also something that puzzles me. When Blackpink first came out people kept asking about their debut songs that were very dance-beat+no singing or rap heavy. I can’t really answer such questions. Sorry, I started talking too much. This isn’t directed only at you, it’s just so anyone who asks about rap-heavy songs or songs without much singing, or people who ask questions that aren’t specific.

      To answer your question: Lyn supports, very well actually. Well into the fifth octave.

      Like

      1. I don’t why exactly but for some reason when I post questions they don’t show up.
        I replied to this question because it seemed like a sure way to get you. I posted a question on November 17th….but no one saw it so I’m a little sad Lol… Will you look at it for me please?

        Like

  17. Hi i have a question that is not K-pop related but it really bugs me. In this song at 4.06 Rita sings a high note in the background, when i first heard it i thougt it was a note in the sixth octave, somewhere around EB6 maybe, but then i read somewhere ( do not remember where sorry ) that the note is actually Eb5 and i was blown away. How can it sound so high to me, like an octave higher than it actually is, even now when i listen to it, it sounds like a sixth octave note. What is going on ? Am i tone deaf ?

    Like

    1. It’s an Eb5, but because it’s in the background and quiet, it can be kind of misleading. If you listen to it with earphones on, it could blend in and sound higher. If you were tone deaf you wouldn’t be able to tell it’s an Eb at all to begin with.

      Like

  18. Sorry, this is a personal question. I have an assignment for my class. We have to make a parody of a Christmas holiday song and create politically related lyrics. For a beginner singer, which songs would you recommend me to pick?

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    1. That’s a very interesting question? LOL Uhm I think a Christmas song that’s relatively easy is like Hark the Harold Sing cause the melody is kind of straight forward, or Santa Claus is Coming to Town? The range isn’t too wide for either song.

      Like

    1. You have a nice baritone voice. You sound untrained and there’s quite a bit of a shallow quality when you sing with more volume. Like most less trained vocalists, instead of allowing stronger vocal cord vibrations, you contract the throat muscles and push that way to create volume. The sound becomes then less full but louder, so working to fully develop the vocal cords will work well for you considering the softer parts were much better stretched.

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      1. There’s a certain degree of support, but she’s pushing and there is tension. So it isn’t something we include on her supported range.

        Like

      2. I remember in Sohyang’s viocal analysis, her supported range is G#3/A3 – C6/C#6 – F6 (including head voice). So which video does she support F6?

        Like

    1. Hello! Have you asked about your singing before? You have a beautiful voice! Your support is also present! Careful with lowering your larynx on low notes even if you only do it slightly.

      Like

      1. Yes ive asked about my voice several times before….you’ve guided me well ..do you think i support those eb4s…and how about my placement especially the belted D4….thank you so much

        Like

    1. I think someone answered a similar question saying that no, Haechan doesn’t support.

      SM is pushing him as main vocalist because everyone likes his “unique” voice. It seems to me that SM is not paying as much attention to proper vocal technique as they did before.

      (no hate to Haechan, I love him, but from KRY and ChenBaekSoo to NCT there’s definitely been a drop vocal-wise)

      Like

      1. I’ve seen the admins say Haechan sings with some support but mostly too shallow. imo I’d still say SM is pushing Taeil as main and Haechan, Doyoung and/or Jaehyun as leads. NCT isn’t close to SJ or EXO, but I think they’re getting there. Taeil is improving in the A4 area, which is close to SM usual standards.

        Like

      2. Oh yeah, NCT have so much potential and I’m rooting for Taeil, Jungwoo, Doyoung, Jaehyun, Haechan, Chenle and Renjun (lmao they are so many) to become brilliant singers. Taeil is definitely working his way up the ranks that’s for sure.

        Like

  19. Ok..i’ll link in a few
    1)my first audio – https://vocaroo.com/i/s0ShEWwEiBVW

    2)all of me -https://vocaroo.com/i/s1GDgiYRY2UY

    3)pretty recent one(5 months ago)-https://vocaroo.com/i/s0eN2kDQ4LN7
    As for this one, the first verse starts at 0.20 and the climax at 3.23

    4)latest one a few days ago- the one you just commented on-https://vocaroo.com/i/s0Ni7YPVlomj

    How are the techniques?…am i improving?…were there any nice moments?
    Sorry for the long questions….hope to hear from you …

    Like

  20. Does Yunjin support? She sings I Have Nothing at 2:16, at 3:16 her head voice sounds nice. At 4:08 she sings a song by Suhyun, it sounds like her soft palate is raised and she’s not nasal, her chest placement is nice and it seems like there’s support. What do you think about her? I know she used to have classical singing classes when she lived in the US so it’d be nice to see how she deals with contemporary singing
    https://www.vlive.tv/video/100851

    Like

    1. Who is Yunjin? Like who are these girls? There’s a degree of support, but not on D5’s. Also Her throat shaping isn’t very open, so even in the fourth octave there’s a lack of roundness to her tone quality. It’s a bit cut off by the lack of openness, so it’s as if she’s pushing the sound forward as opposed to letting it grow from within and then unleashing it. If that makes sense. 3:06 Really flat note here, her runs are also quite pitchy and just imprecise. I’m not hearing a head voice I’d expect from a classical vocalist. I’m sorry but this question feels really out of context cause I really have no idea who these two girls are. She does support, but she pushes a lot. She doesn’t sound “classically trained” in the sense of what one who is would sound like. I think she supports, she has a chesty mix, she pushes, she lacks openness and needs to be careful with pitch, in general. Does this kind of answer your question?

      Like

      1. She was a contestant in Produce48 and she’s a trainee under Pledis. The other girl is Gaeun from After School. It’s a little sad that you don’t know her lol This is her playing a role in The Phantom of The Opera https://youtu.be/5cGzF4SMLtM?t=17. Thank you for answering my question, it was very helpful.

        Like

      2. Oh her!!! Someone showed me this video, I could not recognize her at all. But like I refuse to watch these survival shows so I wouldn’t know many of these girls. Also THAT Gaeun? Had no idea!

        Like

    1. It’s a very vague question about she did on this. Someone already asked about this actually, and they asked if she was shallow and my answer was yes. Which means there isn’t any fully established support yet.

      Like

  21. I’m aware that theres a new criteria for vocalists, but I was wondering what the old criteria was for an excellent Tenor and Baritone? I won’t be using using it to categorize any singer, as there’s probably isn’t any contemporary male singer even considered to be excellent but rather to compare myself to it and make it a goal. You can respond privately through email if your prefer.

    Like

  22. Hi Ahmin,
    Recent, I have wondered some questions.
    Is Sohyang’s vocal type Light Lyric Soprano or Full Lyric Soprano?
    Is Celine Dion’s vocal type Light Lyric Soprano or Full Lyric Soprano?

    Like

    1. We’ve taken out the specific voice types for a reason. I think Sohyang is most likely a light lyric. Celine, I never thought about it.

      Like

      1. I wonder because I remember in Sohyang’s vocal analysis, her vocal type is Full Lyric Soprano.

        1:37 the word “when” ( F#3) is it supported?

        Like

  23. This is my opinion but I think Sohyang’s voice is starting to regress because of her age and bad health, but her stans keep declining it.
    I just want to ask Ahmin’s opinions about it.
    For example, in my opinions, the video of her singing Hug Me live has a lot of problems.

    IMO she’s singing way too nasally than usual.
    She couldn’t perform the light mix in the 1st chorus.
    A lot of parts had tongue tension, it’s like she was singing with ‘r’ at the end of note, some even almost straining.
    3:05 ‘teokke’ strained with pushed back tongue.
    3:14 high larynx F#5.
    3:16 man that part definitely is high larynx.
    3:24 strained E5.
    Did I hear it right or it’s just me too sensitive to it? It would be nice if you could answer this question because I don’t think any analysis gonna ever come out in near future to clear this confusion. Thanks in advance.

    Like

    1. Okay so I’m only going to answer because you provided a specific question with time stamps. Nasality isn’t a problem if a vocalist can turn it on and off at will, it hen she’s phrasing even some occasional nasality happens, it’s not like she doesn’t get rid of it when she needs to open up her vowels. Nasality is also not damaging. Her tongue rolls back sometimes on sustained notes but that’s nothing new. It happens to me, it happens to Natalie weiss, it happens to many people. It’s very occasional and there’s little to no tension present. 3:05 it was suddenly really heady but that’s about it, strained, nope. This note was really weird, she might have been tired. The rest, aside from slight tension on what I think was the quickly sustained G#5 at the top and the E5 at the end, it wasn’t strained or a high larynx. There was very very light pushing, which isn’t ideal but it’s so minimal that to go and call that strain is a real big stretch. Random numbers, but it strain is a 60% plus, that was a 5% or less of tension and to call that strain is really inaccurate. I think instead of too sensitive, you may at this point have an issue hearing specific sounds and discerning them to know what’s really going on. Which is fine, I am still learning and getting better everyday!

      Like

  24. Hey I wanted to ask if goeun from pd48 can support? She is probably going to be the main vocal of rbw’s new girl group or at least I think so… so I was kinda wondering about her vocal ability also it would be nice if you could tell me if those runs are any good 1:46

    Like

    1. Yes, she does support. There’s some shallowness with her softer notes being too falsetto-like and losing connection. 1:46 Right before this run, the other ones were more precise in pitch. A bit flat and lacking flexibility, but better than the one you asked about where she was quite considerably less precise.

      Like

      1. Isn’t RBW Mamamoo’s company? Was Goeun mixing in a chesty way here then? I assume she isn’t on the level of skill of MMM’s vocalists, but is her support decent, as in not too shallow?

        Like

      2. No, it’s not too shallow. She didn’t sing very high, there wasn’t really much place for her to belt or be chesty. She is kind of more balanced.

        Like

    1. It means that the mixed voice is produced with a bright quality over a dark quality. That’s achieved through a higher placement, usually in the mask more so than in the chest while at the same time using less of the chest voice muscles and more of the head voice ones in contrast.

      Like

  25. Can you give me some tips(if there are) to overcome fear when singing around with people?? i never sing in my life but when i am asked to sing like in karaoke im starting to palpitate really hard and my hands is shaking, i have taken some tone deaf test online and i pass all of them but when i sing with them my ears cant hear the sound i sing that’s why i always sound flat ://

    Like

      1. Because when i was on my 5th grade i was humiliated by my music teacher infront of my classmate(saying i suck and just go lipsync) and got scolded during the our actual stage performance when i tried not to lipsync

        Like

      2. What kind of music teacher would do such a thing? That’s traumatic and discouraging anybody is highly unprofessional. But when you’re with your friends, they aren’t all amazing singers, right? But they don’t care and just sing anyway right? Because you’re in a safe environment with your friends so it shouldn’t matter if you’re good or not! Just have fun! Music is about sharing with people, it doesn’t matter if you’re not good if you’re not there to be paid for it, yknow? Wouldn’t you rather enjoy yourself?

        Like

    1. Hey so If you are busy than thats ok, but if there is any other reason why my question wasn’t answered than may I ask why? just wanna make sure to know how to ask questions properly in the blog, i didnt provide time stamps cause I wanted to know if he supported at all, not just the G4s, so i figured you would listen to most of the song, but yea let me know if I should provide something else, thank you

      Like

      1. I’m going to very honest and tell you that the main reason I didn’t answer is cause I didn’t even know this comment was posted. I didn’t see it at all. He is phrasing many G4’s, his Spanish is very nice. I feel happy that he’s singing in Spanish, even if I don’t know the song. It’s very pretty. He is not supporting very well throughout, kind of overly light and a bit too tight throughout. His throat isn’t open, he isn’t breathing deeply nor using his diaphragm. It’s all very shallow, the minimum needed. He’s less shallow in Korean, but still somewhat shallow throughout. I looked him up, he was born and raised in Chile/South America, so that’s why his Spanish is like perfect. But he also has never had vocal lessons/training, which explains his lack of basics in support and breathing. He has a pretty tone.

        Like

      2. oh i see no problem and thank you for the very detailed resonse:) and for the extra info, thats pretty cool that he’s from chile, wasn’t sure of the exact country, and yea he has a nice voice, reminds me of kevin in a way, how boyish they sound and look

        Like

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