About & Our Criteria

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Vocal Analyses

THE TEAM PAGE HERE

FUTURE ANALYSES HERE

This blog was made with the intent to share knowledge and share vocal analyses from different vocalists in K-pop. Nobody in the blog is a hater or an anti-fan. The analyses give positive and negative points and are all constructive criticism, nobody is telling you to hate or not listen to your favorite idol vocalist. We’re only letting you know what their vocal skill based on what vocal technique and music theory is from a musically professional standpoint. If you’re confused about rankings, categories and such, click the about and our criteria page. This post will also include the information existing in that page if you’re unwilling to click through just click read more. Otherwise click About & Our Criteria and most questions should be answered. We try to back up all our points with substantial evidence from the singers’ performances, we thoroughly listen to their performances from past and present. No one in this blog claims to be an expert, we’re all learning and everyday we learn more and more, just as we respect your opinions, please respect ours, which were influenced by the knowledge we have and the way we’ve been taught. Thank you.

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This blog is dedicated to compile vocal analyses done by our contributors in order to satisfy everyone’s curiosity regarding their idols’ vocal. The analysis will be based solely on VOCAL TECHNIQUE, not tone, timbre, emotions, stage presence, etc.

The analysis might change according to their latest performance.

If you would like your idol to be analyzed feel free to drop the question in the comment box. If you feel that the analysis is not accurate, you could suggest a video or recording and give us the reasoning behind your disagreement. We will gladly alter the vocal analysis page of the respective idol if your reasoning behind it is proven.

Comments will be moderated. Constructive discussion are welcome. Bashful and hateful comments will be deleted. Every idol mentioned here are talented in their own way. Even so, we are focusing solely on their vocal capabilities and we try our best to give an objective analysis regarding the matters.

So far, we will use this system as our judging criteria. We will elaborate more once it’s established. It goes from best to worst.

TERMINOLOGY

Tones/Semitones/Notes/Key
A key of a song means within the key signature of the song. There are 12 notes in total, C C#/Db D D#/Eb E F F#/Gb G G#/Ab A A#/Bb B and back to C, completing one full octave. A tone is from a note up two semitones, so the distance between C and C#/Db is a semitone, whereas C and D are a full note apart. A major Key will follow a tone tone semitone tone tone tone semitone pattern, so C major is C D E F G A B C. Although there are no sharps or flats between E and F or B and C, they’re a semitone apart. # stands for sharp and b stands for flat and whether or not you name a note sharp or flat depends on the key, i.e. C# major and Db major are the same key with different names, C# D# E# F# G# A# B# C# and Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C Db, on a piano the same notes are played, just with different names.

Intonation
Being able to stay in pitch and in key. Good intonation means not going sharp, flat or singing a note that isn’t within the chord progression and/or key of the song. Going sharp means slightly above the pitch but not really hitting a note above, so like a note in between C and C#, and flat means a note that’s slightly below pitch, so a note in between C and B, for example.

Larynx Position/High Larynx/Low Larynx/Neutral Larynx
The larynx is the part of the body where the vocal cords are located. The vocal cords are very small and are divided into two parts that vibrate against one another in order to create sound. The speed of the vibration generally determines the pitch someone sings in. Much like tuning a guitar, the more stretched the vocal cords are and thinner they become, the higher the pitch and the thicker they are, the lower the pitch is. In order for a note to be hit, one should have a relaxed opened sound in the larynx, without any restrictions from the throat muscles. If the larynx is pushed down, it creates a froggy and fake “soulful” tone, if it’s pulled up, it creates a thinner, squeezed and tight quality to the voice. The natural state of the larynx is being neutral when it’s relaxed, if it’s forced either up or down, that means the muscles in the throat are creating tension and the larynx is trying to reposition itself in an uncomfortable and unnatural position to hit notes that are not within the individual’s supported range. 

Tonality/Tone Production
The way tone and sound is produced through good support. The voice comes out stable, without any laryngeal restriction nor tension, tone is clean and has the true sound of the individual’s voice type, without an uncentered pitch, excessive breathiness, nasality and tension.

Vibrato
The shift between two notes rapidly within, normally, a sustained note. The difference between the notes is usually less than a semitone. A forced throaty vibrato is usually produced artificially by using the throat, instead of the natural vibrato that comes out once the vocal cords are relaxed with good breath support.

Stability
The stability of the voice, meaning it’s not off pitch and it doesn’t sound wobbly, shaky and unsupported.

Registers
Chest voice, lowest range. Head voice, highest range. Mixed voice, the belting area of the voice.

Support
How the individual vocalist uses their correct breathing technique with the diaphragm to better support, project and hold their voice together.

Placement vs Resonance vs Projection
Resonance is the optimum sound a vocalist should focus on when singing. It is a full, clean and round sound that won’t sound thin, constricted or small. A vocalist who’s resonant will use different types of placements, i.e. their voice will be placed either in their chest, head or mask (cheekbones area, not nose) to project their voice, in each individual register. A vocalist may be able to be resonant in their mixed voice by normally placing their voice in their mask with chest resonance, or as they go higher, with head resonance. A resonant sound is always going to be a projected sound, now resonance doesn’t mean loud, because a loud sound may still be pushed and strained. You may project but still have tension, but in true resonance tension should not be present. Resonance is produced when the vocalist is able to support their voice. In other words, they have developed vocal cords that are able to connect fully in a healthy manner, without breathiness coming between them nor too much constriction, against the right amount of air pressure. Then the supported sound is enhanced with the proper placement of sound, while keeping the soft palate lifted, the larynx position not high, the swallowing muscles, jaw, tongue And throat relaxed and the jaw dropped so as to amplify the sound of the voice. The combination of an open throat, support, relaxed singing and proper placement is what creates healthy resonance in singing.

Vocal Range vs Supported Range vs Tessitura
Vocal range means the individual’s lowest singable note to the individual’s highest singable note.  A tessitura will depend on the individual’s voice type and where their voice sits most comfortably, shines the most and could project the best. A supported range includes notes outside the tessitura where the individual’s voice type may not be naturally inclined to project well in, however so due to the vocalist’s own ability, they’re able to still maintain tone production, support, projection and stability. e.g In classical music, sopranos’ tessituras are something in between A3/C4 to  A5/C6, however in contemporary music a soprano singing as high as C6 is very uncommon and unnecessary; a contemporary soprano, for an example Luna, is able to keep resonance consistently up until Eb5, which is almost ideal for a soprano who should be able to carry that resonance up until A5 without a problem. However so she’s also able to sing down to G3 with correct support, which although is outside her voice type’s natural tessitura, she’s still able to keep support and projection down there.

Musicianship/Musicality
Musicianship is the act of changing any song given to you and making it your own, usually on the spot. This includes melodic changes, rhythmic changes and added embellishments. Musicality is the act of interpreting music correctly according to each individual genre of music, by adding the correct use of vocal effects (e.g. raspiness, breathiness, growls, vocal runs, vibrato) and playing with the song musically by adding dynamics (e.g. singing softly, loudly, powerfully on the right moments of each song).

Passaggi/Vocal Bridges
A passaggio or a vocal bridge is an area of the voice where one’s voices transition naturally from one to the other in the modal register. Usually for males, the distance between the first passaggio, from chest voice to mixed voice, and the second passaggio, from mixed voice to head voice, is only about a 4th apart, whereas for females it’s about an octave apart. Passaggi are important for one to be able to tell what someone’s voice type is. A register break or the highest note you can sing in your chest/mixed voice before transitioning into head voice is NOT your first passaggio. The first passaggio is a note in your range where your voice naturally feels a switch of muscle coordination in your vocal cords. That doesn’t mean you can’t bring a chest dominant or balanced mixed voice above your first or even second passaggio. Lyric tenors usually have their passaggi around D4/Eb4 and G4/Ab4, whereas lyric baritones have their passaggi at B3 and E4. Lyric sopranos are usually at F4/F#4 and F5/F#5.

Legato/Staccato
A musical phrase usually will last a couple of bars. During a phrase, the melody may be played/sung smoothly connected without every note sounding chopped up, whereas staccato means emphasizing every single note separately with minor less than a second breaks in between every note. Legato is the most basic form of singing through correct breath control and support.

Agility
Vocal agility is an embellishment and it means, being able to sing many notes accurately and quickly, by separating each individual note while still being able to connect them within one sung vowel. Those are usually called melismas or vocal runs.

CRITERIA

Excellent Vocalist

  • All three registers are developed
  • Supported as close as possible from their highest to lowest extremities
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for sopranos falls somewhere within C3 ~ E3 (or lower) and G5 (or higher)
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for mezzo-sopranos falls somewhere within Bb2 ~ D3 (or lower) and F5 (or higher)
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for tenors falls somewhere within F#2 ~ A2 (or lower) and C5/C#5 (or higher)
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for baritones falls somewhere within D2 ~ F#2 (or lower) and A4/Bb4 (or higher)
  • Within their Voice Type’s tessitura they are consistently resonant
  • Complete support in the middle register and lower register
  • For females head voice must be completely resonant at will; for males head voice must be completely supported
  • Connection in the voice with no noticeable breaks when transitions are being made
  • Agility is present and pitch is controlled with good separation between individual note, potentially very complex runs are done from the bottom to the top of their ranges
  • Musicianship the ability to change a song and make it their own and Musicality having complete control over the voice in any given genre
  • Almost perfect intonation
  • Tonality is almost never lost

Great 

  • Developed registers, but one register may be lacking in development
  • Optimal resonance is achieved on a regular basis
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for sopranos falls somewhere within F3/F#3 and F#5/G5
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for mezzo-sopranos falls somewhere within Eb3/E3 and E5
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for tenors falls somewhere within A2/Bb2 and B4/C5
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for baritones falls somewhere within F#2/G2 and G#4/A4
  • Support is present in all registers, but maybe not to their lowest and highest extremes
  • Within in their voice type’s tessitura they are resonant and well projected, but not as resonant and well projected as Excellent vocalist
  • Connection in the voice with no noticeable breaks
  • Agility is present and pitch is controlled with good separation between individual notes
  • Great interpretation skills (Musicianship), but Musicality may not be as finely tuned as Excellent vocalist
  • Intonation is almost perfect
  • Tonality is almost never lost

Good 

  • One very well developed register or two well developed registers, with the others either being Average or Above Average
  • Able to sing through their first passaggio and second passaggi with support and resonance, and above
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for sopranos falls somewhere within F#3/G3 and E5/F5
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for mezzo-sopranos falls somewhere within E3/F3 and D5/Eb5
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for tenors falls somewhere within Bb2/B2/C3 and Bb4/B4
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for baritones falls somewhere within G2/G#2 and F#4/G4
  • Optimal resonance often present, but is not always achieved
  • Within their vocal type’s tessitura they are resonant and supported, but tonality can be lost at times.
  • Connection between registers is not always present
  • Some agility, but runs and transitions are not always controlled
  • Interpretation skills are present, has show musicality
  • Good intonation rarely goes off
  • At times can lose tonality by rarely does

Proficient 

  • One well developed or two/three somewhat developed register well balanced
  • Able to sing through their first passaggio and second passaggi with support and resonance
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for sopranos falls somewhere within G#3/A3 and D5/Eb5
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for mezzo-sopranos falls somewhere within F#3 and C5/C#5
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for tenors falls somewhere within C3/C#3 and G#4/A4
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for baritones falls somewhere within G#2/A2 and E4/F4
  • Consistently supported within their supported range
  • Resonates at times, but optimal resonance is not a regular occurrence
  • Connection between the registers is not present
  • Intonation is not perfect, off-key moments happen at times
  • Good tonality isn’t always kept, strain and tension are apparent at times

Above Average

  • One somewhat developed register with the others being average or weak
  • Able to sing through their first passaggio with consistent support and possible resonance up to their second passaggio
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for sopranos falls somewhere within A3 and C5/C#5
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for mezzo-sopranos falls somewhere within G3 and B4/C5
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for tenors falls somewhere within D3 and G4/G#4
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for baritones falls somewhere within Bb2/B2 and Eb4/E4
  • Inconsistent with resonance
  • Even in their supported range strain and tension can be present
  • Nasality can be present within the voice at times
  • Intonation issues can be frequent

Average

  • No register is developed considerably well
  • Able to sing through their first passaggio with adequate and consistent support
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for sopranos falls somewhere within Bb3 and Bb4/B4
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for mezzo-sopranos falls somewhere within G#3 and A4
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for tenors falls somewhere within Eb3 and F4/F#4
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for baritones falls somewhere within C3/C#3 and C#4/D4
  • Inconsistent with support, and if at all resonance, even if occasional resonance has happened
  • Good tonality is not present at all times, nasal placement is normally used
  • Frequent intonation issues

Weak

  • No developed registers
  • Unable to sing through their first passaggio with adequate and consistent support
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for sopranos falls somewhere within B3 and G#4/A4 (or less)
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for mezzo-sopranos falls somewhere within A3 and F#4 (or less)
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for tenors falls somewhere within E3/F3 and Eb4/E4 (or less)
  • Range wise, supported range without head voice for baritones falls somewhere within C#3/D3 and B3/C4/C#4 (or less)
  • Very inconsistent with support, strain,no resonance
  • Good tonality is not present
  • Out off tune singing is frequent

FYI, Among K-POP idols there is NO ONE who is considered Excellent/Amazing/Fantastic vocal-wise. They are Great/Good at best.

For further question you can ask the contributors directly at this forum

OneHallyu vocals’ thread

Regards,

Admin

FUTURE ANALYSES HERE

THE TEAM PAGE HERE

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9,032 thoughts on “About & Our Criteria

      1. In comparison to Winter Rose, I think Camellia Girl(?) has a few more runs/trills that I don’t think she showed off last time around 0:51, 2:39, 2:48, and 3:23 specifically whose execution I was curious about.

        In the lowest parts of this song, sounds like she’s pushing down her larynx again to hit these notes just like in Winter Rose. I’m wondering where in her upper range does her support drop off, if at all, and if she produces any resonance too! :^D

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      2. 0:51 The trill was nice, mostly. 2:39 She’s so heady here, like placement wise. The run wasn’t too difficult. Her trills overall throughout are okay. She sounds headier throughout and less throaty by default. I remember her support dropping around C#5.

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      3. oh cool, thanks!

        Question about technique in general now, you say she’s headier and less throaty, but is a heady placement good? Being throaty I’m aware is not good, so it makes me want to believe heady is good, but I didn’t think being heady was necessarily a good thing? I remember you saying one should try to sing through the diaphragm as opposed to squeezing notes out the throat or letting it out through the nose, but is being “diaphragmy” or a “diaphragm placement” a thing? Can you sing from your diaphragm and still have a heady placement?

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      4. She’s headier in both placement, which makes her lose projection, and her mixing in general which does help be less throaty in this case. Diaphragm is the breathing method, it’s got nothing to do with how you place the voice. You’re confusing the terms right now. Essentially heady placement is placing the sound in the head but you can have a balanced mixed voice and place it in the head or a heady mix and place it in the mask. In her case it was too heady and placed too high in the head as well as inward.

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      5. Oh, I see! I’m definitely mixing up terms. I still have so much to learn~ lol. Since mixing is kind of a combination of head and chest, throatiness is a common issue as it’s sort of like the “halfway point” between the two, so Lee Yejoon leaning more towards head placement helps avoid being overtly throaty (which would sound very tight)? Placing the voice in one’s chest offers more projection since it’s like… a larger area? which is why those who have headier placements like Hyorin or BoA can have some issues with projection?

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      6. Not necessarily, BoA is heady in her mix but she places her sound in her mask actually. Hyorin isn’t heady either. The thing is that throatiness comes often from being heavy and carrying too much chest upward without supporting properly. Headiness is usually lighter and is easier to be relaxed on. Also placing a note that’s not high enough to be placed too high causes you to lose projection oftentimes. More so than placed too high in the head, it was not projected cause it was placed inward.

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      7. Ohhh, okay! Every time I read one of your comments I feel like a learn a bit more!

        A final question, another arbitrary one cuz I love them, but this is another like “check my knowledge” type of thing. If you were to rate Lee Yejoon based off the criteria of the blog and the super super small sample of videos I sent you (idk if you listen to her otherwise) would she be AA~P ? My reasoning for this as follows:

        Her support drops at G#3 and C#5, which is the lower range for Proficient and the upper range for AA for Sopranos. She seems consistently resonant –in those two videos lol– throughout her range, which is more of a P trait. She can be too heady outside of her supported range though, and pushes her larynx down in the lowest parts of her demonstrated range, which would both be dings against her. While she generally has good tone and an open and relaxed mix/good placement, she has strain when belting C#5 and above and pushes her larynx down below G#3 which creates some strain & tension, though her general headiness helps alleviate some of the tension in her throat.

        If those two videos I sent were the only material you had to do an analysis of her, would you agree with what I wrote (basically amalgamated what I understand from what you said) and that she’d be somewhere between AA and P, either more specifically in AA-P (3.5) or low in P (4)? If you wanna say “We don’t give scores without a proper analysis” that’s…. fine too LOL :^D

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      8. Since you went through the trouble of thinking all this through I’ll say that in my mind she was giving me Solar/Wheein vibes rating wise but thinking about it carefully in between is a possibility too.

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      9. Aw thanks so much for indulging my bothersome question again, being compared to Solar/Wheein definitely isn’t a bad thing to hear, and helps me understand her (LYJ) a bit better by looking more closely at both of their (S&WI) analyses. Hopefully when requests open again, I’ll manage to throw Lee Yejoon into the pot huhuhu.

        Thank again Ahmin, next time I come back with another Q i’ll have an even better understanding! (I hope) :]

        Liked by 1 person

  1. hey guys, i know we’re not supposed to ask about western vocalists but for some reason you guys are the ones i trust the most to ask. i remember reading some comments here about rihanna and how she’s not a complete mess despite what most people think, so i took some time to check her vocal ranges and performances and for some reason i can’t really tell whether she supports or not. even though i’ve heard people saying that she does, on the level of consistency of jessica jung but does. so, if you could, only bc she’s my favorite vocalist in the world and the only one i care about in the american pop, could you check how was the G#4 and A4’s for this performance? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tMbAwTMVW0

    i promise i won’t ever ask about western vocalists again ^^

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    1. I’m sorry but I have to adhere to the rules. But I wouldn’t say this is a good song to talk about her support. Now I don’t think she doesn’t support, I just think she has some stylistic choices with belting too low and the unsupported breathiness that really get in the way.

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    1. Hi, I’m not ahmin but Is this the same person as the one who did the A4 in Bamdadi? I don’t think Joochan can support. He sounds really nasal/breathy and his throat sounds squeezed kinda? All his issues can be seen at once during his F#4 at 0:26.

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    2. I heard another clip in which he sounded like he could and in this, he was inconsistently going from a tight sound to a more relaxed one and I’m not entirely sure why. Oh nevermind, the other clip I heard was of their other main vocalist, Y, who sounded much more opened and better supported. This main vocalist is Joochan, he doesn’t sound nearly as relaxed or consistently supported.

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      1. I tried to find more clips even though there are few clips since they just debuted and It seems that he really is inconsistent with support. He’s still a rookie tho so he still has time to improve.

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  2. I’m sorry for dropping this random recording but i feel like this is my best C5 so far and i don’t even bother to check if there’a a couple of weird sounds (i was chatting while recording lol) so, what do you think?
    I hope it’s good, also the audio doesn’t sound so bad, right?

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    1. I have a few issues, the first one being that you started with more air than you needed to. You didn’t go straight into a connection between your vocal cords, you let a puff of air come out before you sang. Also your Ah vowels and 어 vowels aren’t opened enough. You need to allow your jaw to drop more naturally and keep the sound out more, I feel like you lock the sound inwards, 0:02 0:03 Aye and Ah there, the vowel wasn’t dropped enough so the sound wasn’t fully free. 0:32 could drop the jaw more here. 0:42 Very heady here, needs just a bit of chest to balance the mix. 0:56 a bit pushed on the C#5, but a better balance of mixing. I think you did generally really well, but the diction is just getting in the way of your openness.

      Like

  3. Hi,

    I just wanted to thank you for all those helpfull analyses and posts! Also I have one question. What is Twice’s Jihyo supported range?

    (Sorry if I made any mistake. English is not my first language.)

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    1. I’m sorry dear, I’d rather answer this question by analyzing Jihyo so let’s wait for her analysis, okay? Also your English is just fine!

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    1. Hi! I can speak 5 languages, Korean, English, Portuguese, Spanish and German. I generally answer questions in Portuguese more often than Spanish.

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      1. damn.
        that is FAR beyond expectation. you really are something, dude.
        just.. damn.

        i think you should really consider being foreign language teacher once you lost interest in kpop lol

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      2. Actually I doubt I’d ever lose an interest in K-pop. I’m too integrated in the culture and music is my career, it’s been 10 years so I doubt it’s just a phase. I love languages but my passion lies in teaching singing. ^ ^

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  4. Hiiiii ahmin and all the admins , there is a guy who says his voice is between tenor and baritone, so I told him I don’t think that’s possible but he’s saying that there is a device that tells you what your voice type and he said I’m half half also he said there are singers who are half baritone half tenor too! How is that ???

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    1. There’s a voice type called baritenor, but it is an arguable voice type. I heard that instructors who call a vocalist a baritenor are just incapable of determining the voice type of the student and so instead of blaming it on their lack of hearing ability, they blame it on the student’s voice. I am not sure if I agree with that but I’m also not sure that I agree that it’s a voice type either. I honestly don’t know what to think of hybrid voice types.

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  5. Hi ahmin
    I remember you used to say that Jihyo analysis will be out this year and itz October now. Still will her analysis be out this year? I cannot wait

    Like

    1. Please be patient and respect us. I understand you’re eager, but we have lives of our own and we’re busy, we’re not getting paid to write analyses. We do this on our spare time.

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  6. Olá, tudo bem? Eu queria fazer uma pergunta (mesmo que seja sem sentido). Eu posso mudar de um tenor para um barítono com o passar do tempo?

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  7. É que eu achei que fosse possível, mas não é mais no meu caso. Ahmin, eu te admiro muito e te acho um cantor talentoso e eu acho sua voz muito bonita! Espero algum dia ser como você. ^-^

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    1. Ah muito muito obrigado!! E normalmente não acontece mas a voz da Jojo também mudou, ela costumava ser soprano e agora ela é uma mezzo.

      Like

  8. Ahmin, could you please analyse this cover of Dear Love (So Hyang version) by a Korean man? To what extent did he support? Thank you very much.

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    1. Who is this? This isn’t a vocalist we would analyze in the future, he’s not an artist or anything and unless you know him personally, I don’t see why talk about someone’s technique when they’re not professionals.

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  9. Hello!
    I’d kinda like to see if my general idea of vocal technique is at least somewhat accurate. Are these true?
    1) Support + good placement + open throat = resonance
    2) Diaphragm breathing + lack of tension = support (Iffy about this one)
    3) Resonance + pushing = pushed resonance (until pushing takes over)
    4) Support + some tension = mostly supported ; Support + lots of tension = tense and unsupported
    5) Support + laryngeal vibrato = no more support, support + jaw vibrato = support
    6) Chesty mix =/= chesty placement ; heady mix =/= heady placement
    7) Chesty mix leads to straining/pushing, heady mix can lead to lack of projection?
    Thank you!

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    1. 1. Generally yes
      2. Vocal cord connection and proper stretch are also necessary
      3. Yes
      4. Yes generally since it’s a spectrum
      5. Laryngeal vibrato doesn’t necessarily cancel out support but it can get in the way
      6. Yes
      7. Not necessarily, a heady mix can be projected if placed well but it won’t be as loud as a chesty mix or as bassy or round whereas a chesty mix can lead to straining but doesn’t 100% lead to tension.

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      1. I’m sorry, but did you say falsetto for the second octave? He was singing in the fourth octave though, he was singing G4’s and singing down to about Bb3 or so. You’re right, he’s belting and he’s not using falsetto. So what’s the purpose of your question?

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  10. Hi! I have quite a random question about singing that I thought was quite interesting. You know how people who sing pop music in English typically default to an American-esque, if not a totally American, accent? For an American, this might not be such a ‘shock’, so to speak. However, say, for British people or Australians, this change is quite drastic (yet, for the most part, surprisingly natural). Of course, this mostly applies to popular music; national anthems and theatre are perhaps some examples where conversational accents may arise more often. My question is, to what extent do you think that this occurs in Korean pop music? In other words, how different do you think the average Kpop idol’s diction differs from the standard spoken pronunciation with perhaps any specific examples? Do you think it leans towards an ‘American flavor’ at all?

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    1. In my opinion, I think Korean pop song diction is pretty true to the spoken language. Some differences that I do find typically happen with the 어 and 오 vowels. For example, often the 너 in 너와 sounds more similar to an American English ‘no’ when it’s sung compared to when it’s spoken. I think the most drastic changes lie actually in tempo, as words in songs tend to be so much more slow and drawn out than their spoken speeds and the difference is more drastic in Korean than English. That’s just my two cents, but I’d like to see what you think about this as well haha

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    2. Wait do you mean Koreans try to enunciate Korean with an American accent? Because I know sometimes rappers and whatnot try to emulate the accents for the style, but generally I think they try to keep it as close to the natural pronunciation as possible, although to an extent that can create issues cause spoken vowels and sung vowels should be different.

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    1. Hi dear! So let me start by saying you sound like a baritone and I’d like to ask how you usually practice your singing. There are some issues going on, for an example you don’t drop your jaw so a lot of your sound stays in your nose, you don’t lift your soft palate, so your pitch tends to fall flat. You also slide a bit too much, and mostly you seem to sing rough, with more throat than you need. Have you seen the video from the vocal tips #8? How to support? That can help you!

      Like

  11. Oh sorry.
    Maybe I do not understand something, but in my country the octave starting with C4 is called the first octave. I will clarify, it seemed to me that in this song V sings ~E5, not using falsetto.

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  12. I just wanna guess some mix quality and is it true?

    Beyonce: balance mix
    Jojo: chesty mix
    Gaga: chesty mix(?)
    Katy: chesty mix
    Miley: chesty mix
    Adele: chesty mix
    Britney: heady mix(?)
    Taylor: chesty mix
    Tinashe: balance-chesty
    Bebe rexha: chesty

    Well yes this is western, bcs for koreans i can more guess it from their analysis or those vocal range/analysist video but i doubt my guess was right to some of these weatern singers. And is it chesty mix more common or is it only me that think/found more of chesty singer? I’m okay if you’re not sure/unfamiliar/bcs not relate to the blog lol *peace

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    1. Who on earth is Bebe Rexha? lol I suppose you’re right, I honestly haven’t thought of how Britney mixes or Taylor, because Taylor doesn’t mix much.

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      1. LOL well she’s oftenly as a featuring singer to dj/rapper

        And is there something can be explain like sometimes when singers develope head voice but they’re chesty (ex Junsu JYJ, ryeowook) or they develope chest voice but they’re heady (ex U.ji, chen or some), or is it just like how they know to do it?

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      2. A developed chest voice or lower range won’t make your chest muscles prominent in your mixed voice necessarily and vice versa.

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  13. So, it’s bothering me for a while.

    Jihyo’s highest note on 1:07 seems different. 2:58 too.
    I can’t hear it clearly on Cheer Up, so..

    On 0:57, it’s the same with the previous video.

    What do you think? My guess is she’s less chesty and pushy as before. But after hearing her Melody Project perf, I think she’s still a bit chesty. I’m confused haha.

    Like

    1. 1:07 was headier, not as pushed. 2:58 wasn’t as different from the usual. It’s just slightly less pushed and slightly less chesty, it’s not a huge difference.

      Like

  14. Is it normal for guys to only be able to head voice on the ‘ooh’ vowel? Because I’ve only ever heard Jung Dongha go above like F5 on the ‘ooh’, and I can only do oohs at all even though I feel super comfortable up to G5. Is it just a diction thing? How do you actually enunciate in head voice?

    Like

    1. That’s not just guys. The ooh vowel is the easiest vowel to feel head placement but it doesn’t mean you can ONLY sing in head voice with ooh.

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      1. Is there an exercise that can help with other vowels then? Actual vowels are kinda okay, but when I actually try to sing lyrics, sometimes the sound won’t come out and I feel like my throat isn’t open, though I don’t feel that when mixing or in chest register.

        Like

      2. Sure, there’s an exercise where you sing the same note on 5 different vowels and you try to keep the shape of the throat as similar/consistent as possible throughout.

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  15. Hi! I know you don’t like commenting on artists you have not evaluated but can you just give me a number on a scale to 1-10 (1 being awful and 10 being excellent) on how rose did here?
    I saw one of your videos about having an “unique” voice and I totally understood what you meant and after watching this video I understood even more. She is singing so “unique” is annoying. I still love her though!

    Like

    1. I’m sorry I can tell what she’s doing, but I’m not going to scale anything with numbers. This song isn’t high at all for her, she is singing mostly G#4’s and some B4’s (0:23) and she’s pushing her voice through most of them. She is not doing so bad on the G#4’s here and there but she is really narrow in her diction and really whiny throughout.

      Like

  16. Hi, Ahmin!
    I was wondering if there are any female K-Pop idols are capable of hitting notes in the whistle register. I’ve seen people mention Dreamcatcher’s Siyeon in one of their Minx songs, but to me that sounds like a very high falsetto. Am I wrong?

    As always, thank you!

    Like

    1. Yes it’s been mentioned in their analyses. Siyeon’s is indeed falsetto. Wendy and Ailee have accessed the whistle register but not used it in songs. Dia is the only one I know who used it in a song.

      Like

  17. Hi,

    I know that you might be tired of questions related to Wanna one but I just want to ask if Daehwi has supported here in this video.

    Like

    1. He is a bit too nasal, a bit shallow. He doesn’t really fully open his throat when he sings and he focuses his sound in his nose. He sounds like there is support, but it’s not very well developed or advanced in development.

      Like

  18. hello, ahmin,

    1) can we mix our voice below the passaggi?
    about passaggi, there are so many different version. for example, sopranos passaggi is F4/F#4 in these website, wiki said it is Eb4, and C#5. some vocal coach have other opinion.
    is it have any consensus of passaggi?

    2) why chesty mix/ belting can sing higher? (chesty mix only use a bit TA muscle,vocal cord didn’t become thin and long,how to produce a high note?)

    3) can you give some example why strain will damage the vocal cord? (i can understand falsetto/airy can damage the vocal cord.) just like squeezing the throat muscle, how to damage the vocal cord? i can’t image it. i can feel it is damaging but i can’t understand how.
    (in my opinion, vocal cord only attach together and air) i have try to find these type of video in youtube but i can’t find the reason. many video said strain is damaging but never explain how.

    4) as i remember, classical singer (male) don’t use mixed voice, but female will use mixed voice. could you explain the different of classical and contemporary mixed voice? i only know classical will lower their larynx and maybe have a heady placement.

    5)bel canto is one of classical system? i’m confused in bel canto and classical singer. and i see someone said bel canto singer will raise their larynx to make their sound light/bright. is it real?

    6) in contemporary vocal system, these have a lot of system such as sls,ss,cvt,etc
    what is the name of your vocal system?

    i’m pretty understand why you didn’t talk more to some opponents. i share a video about resonance in some website and tried to explain what is resonance to some opponents. it is very hard and tired to talk with someone because they can hear the different. they can’t accept some singer without “resonance”. LOL

    Like

    1. 1. Yes we can. We can use head voice below our first and second passaggi, just as we mix below and higher our first and second passaggi too. There should be a consensus but there’s a lot of misinformation out there, so even I’m not 100% sure.

      2. Can sing higher? Higher than what? I don’t understand what you mean.

      3. The vocal cords are muscles, if you pull them apart too hard, they’ll kind of pop and snap. Just like your triceps or your pectoral muscles, if you exercises wrong, they’ll pop and not really heal. Muscles tend to break apart and reheal, the vocal cords may not do it to that extent, but if you squeeze them, they get irritated, they get swollen and then calyces or nodules are formed.

      4. No, this isn’t true. Both of them use mixed voice, they just don’t necessarily call it that. For classical singing, a male’s mixed voice is called “a head voice” even if in contemporary singing, we call it a mix. A high voiced female’s mix generally is more of a very head voice-like mixed voice instead of a chestier mix, like we do it in contemporary music.

      5. Bel canto is the name for the standard classical technique. I have never heard of bel canto raising the larynx, personally.

      6. My vocal system? I incorporate some SLS, some classical technique and some stuff I don’t know where it’s necessarily from. I’m not part of a big organization nor am I trying to be part of their “guaranteed” methods. I just know what works and what doesn’t for whatever style and sound people want to achieve, I’m not trying to compete with others. My way of teaching is how I’ve learned and developed over the years. Everything I do in my life is a mix, I’m of mixed race, I speak several languages and assimilate with several cultures without one specific nationality, I share different religious beliefs, so my way of teaching follows that pattern of being mixed. ^ ^

      Like

  19. Hello! So is there a name for tension in the swallowing muscles? Is that different from glottal tension? I remember you vaguely gestured toward the back/under the jawbone while mentioning glottal tension in one of your videos.

    Like

  20. Hi! It’s been a while since I’ve visited the blog (school’s been killing me, yay senior year) and I’ve missed it! I’ve recently gotten into Knowing Brothers which has made me a big fan of Min Kyung Hoon and Buzz, so I have some questions about my favorite performance of their’s, Travel to Me.

    -I know Kyung Hoon is on your list for those waiting to be analyzed but based on this performance can you say anything about his support or overall technique?

    -From 0:20 to 0:45 he seems to be comfortable, is he straining at all?

    -At 1:01 and 1:58 when he sings “my sunshine” is he straining? To me it looks like he is especially since he’s physically having to jerk his head (which is his signature move but still)

    -At 1:12 is that a transition into falsetto? Is it well done? To me it seems like he does it well due to muscle memory of singing this song so much. He in general seems to be singing better than years ago. Is this a sign of improved technique or a stylistic change?

    -Is his vibrato natural? At 2:15 I can tell that he’s using his jaw to create vibrato. Is he a case like Shannon where jaw vibrato is used but it’s still natural?

    -Overall is his technique damaging? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMIrfoAY2Mo This performance is from 2005 and apart from a few details like whininess (I think) he sounds pretty similar, jaw vibrato, movements, and all.

    Again thank you for running an amazing blog! I really love learning about all of this and I hope my questions make sense 🙂

    Like

    1. Hi there! Nice to see you again!! He is not necessarily straining, but he’s not fully relaxed either. He sings like many untrained 90’s vocalists. Kind of pulling the vowels from inside his throat and keeping the sound kind of small because his throat is barely opened. His breathing is shallow too, he doesn’t really go deep into his diaphragm and most of the sound is in his throat. 1:01? G#4? Yeah I’d say so. I wouldn’t say he’s necessarily supporting at any point, or at least not properly/freely. 1:12 In the sense of transitioning pitch wise, sure it’s done relatively well. In terms of bridging, it sounds like he sang in very different parts of his range even though the falsetto was only Bb4 and the other note back down was C#4. That’s not THAT far, but he is placing the falsetto so high and using such little support, while pushing his chest voice higher and keeping the sound so low in his throat and chest that he makes the interval between C#4 and Bb4 sound SO much bigger than it is. Of course, this could be intentional, but I doubt it. I wouldn’t know if he is singing better than years ago or if he’s improved, I can’t answer this. 2:15 No his vibrato sounds like it’s laryngeal to me.

      The performance from 2005 sounds like he’s pushing his larynx down a lot more than in the recent video, where it comes off as more placement and throatiness, in that one is a bit more forced. He’s less forced but it sounds like more of a change in aging more so than anything else. He sounds very much like a J-rock artist, or 90’s K-pop, technically speaking it’s all throat with pitch. I would say it’s not damaging as much as it is just underdeveloped and limiting. But if it works for his music, then it’s fine. Thank you dear! ❤

      Like

      1. How can you tell apart a natural and a laryngeal vibrato? Also what do you mean by he’s “kind of pulling the vowels”?

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      2. The sound quality is more forced and kind of glottal. I think I meant he’s pulling them from the back of his throat.

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  21. Hello hello! I have a question about IOI/DIA’s Chaeyeon. I know you never plan on analyzing her, but my question isn’t really about like “how is she as a vocalist” so I hope you wouldn’t mind answering it. I’m wondering in the two videos below, can you explain why her voice sounds so different? Like what is she doing with her voice to have such different qualities to it (to my ears).

    In 너무너무너무, it is from ~0:47 until 0:56. For 듣고싶어, ~2:12 until 2:21.

    She sounds exponentially breathier in 듣고싶어, like she’s placing her voice all in her head. For 너무너무너무, she sounds like she actually has some genuine body to her voice, although I want to say it’s pretty much all coming from her (tight) throat. It feels less breathy, a little reminiscent of carrying actual support, at least in comparison to Want to Hear. I know she isn’t actually supporting, but I’m wondering if you can elaborate a bit on what she’s doing to her voice to have such a difference in the sound. The songs are less than a year apart so to me the difference in quality is uhhh, weird, to put it simply. Especially since Want to Hear is more recent than Very Very Very

    She might not be nowhere near a technically skilled vocalist, but at least she’s pretty, right :] ?

    Like

    1. Hi there! Okay so since your question isn’t about her, but it’s a technical question that’s more to do with your learning process and your knowledge, that’s totally fine! Okay so this is actually pretty simple and what you’re saying is right. In one she’s breathy and in the other one she’s not. This is a stylistic choice. One can choose to sing with connected vocal cords or one could allow them to open up slightly so that air escapes which creates a breathier quality. Now, the thing is in neither clips is she supporting properly. Most of the sound is coming from a shallow place where her vocal cords are lazily coming together in 너무x3, whereas in 듣고 싶어 she is just using more breathiness. It’s very simple, everybody does this. I do this, depending on the song and the range and the actual song I want. Now again, she is not using supporting in either video, just more connection but even when singing with the non-breathy quality, she doesn’t really open up her throat, she is shallow in stretch, it’s a lazy, almost flat stretch, with a kind of closed throat. The breathy one is thinner because she’s also singing with a high larynx and even more narrowed throat. Does this make sense?

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      1. Oh yes it does, and thank you for the explanation! For a follow up question: vocal cord connection is desirable in helping to produce proper support, but you said Chaeyeon lazily connects them alongside improperly stretching them and having a closed throat. Is this method of singing damaging to one’s voice in general, and is it also more/less damaging than her being overly breathy? I’d assume the breathier method isn’t damaging because of the lack of connection in the first place; that it’s not damaging, just a poor technique/habit… although you say her throat is even more narrow…

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      2. The way she sings isn’t damaging within a relatively narrow and comfortable range. I’d say the breathier one is more damaging.

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    1. You’re not telling me if this is you or not, but I’m going to assume it is. I hear a lot of throatiness, a lot of tightness and pushing. You’re squeezing your throat, the legato is very damaged because of how tight you’re holding onto your throat. You sound like a young tenor and I think you should try softer and lower songs first because there were issues with the key center as well as a lot of tension throughout.

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      1. Ok, thank you ^^
        I also would like to know if to be considered an “excellent singer”, singers would have to have range + excellent technique + power in their voices. Because all excellent singers like Mariah Carey, Beyonce and Celine Dion all have powerful timbres and a incredible range right? Is it possible to be considered a excellent singer even with a limited range and a “soft” voice? Only with power technique? I know this question seems dumb and confused lol, but I really know nothing about singing.

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      2. Celine Dion isn’t an excellent vocalist. To be an excellent vocalist, you don’t need to sing powerfully all the time but you need a developed voice. This means having power when you choose to, being able to execute dynamics well while singing in a healthy manner throughout your range. A limited range is generally a result of underdeveloped technique. A soft voice too is usually a result of underdeveloped technique. All of these things you seem to think are to do with their natural voices but everyone has about 3 octaves of range, Beyoncé and Celine included. The key is developing all of it well.

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  22. Hiiii ahmin what do you think about this video :
    http://youtu.be/0JDfe2p4cJc I thought there are some differences between some of them on the same category like wouldn’t Mariah be even higher her runs sounds so fast ! Also camila deosnt sound as good as ariana , wouldn’t Jessie j be on the unmatched agility I mean over singing musicianship I don’t know if they affect that much do they ? ok I’m going to hell for this one but i think jojo would’ve been in the exeptional one.

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  23. Hey Ahmin, are you familiar with the rookie group A.C.E? i was just wondering if the vocalist in this video staring at 0:30 is a baritone, i dont know if a couple seconds of singing is enough for your to tell tho, i understand if its not haha https://youtu.be/5-Dei8bzpqw he sounds a bit like nct’s jaehyun to me

    Like

    1. He might be a baritone but the range he was singing in was kind of limiting and it was around G4 where he was closing a lot more than he needed to, so I’m not sure it’s the best range for me to be sure.

      Like

      1. i think it look like vocal fry sound 0:32 1:08 1:57 2:50 maybe because of vocal cord compressed too much?

        and can you tell me which one is resonance in this video?
        0:07-0:11 i think the last note C5 is resonance but could be more relaxed. but how about the note before C5?
        0:38 Jung Dongha’s G#4 is it really throat tension? it sound pretty good for me. is it supported?
        1:22 resonance
        1:30-1:33 i think 1:30 is resonance and 1:33 is supported
        1:57 sound like strain for me
        2:07 supported, could be more open
        2:28 strained
        2:44 Bb4 is resonance but C5 look like have tension
        3:03 resonance
        3:13&3:17 resonance
        3:32 resonance
        3:40-3:54 strained
        3:56-4:07 i think it is supported but not sure resonance
        4:23 is it tongue tension? but it sound like supported
        4:36-4:45 how about the notes before the G5 resonance?

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      2. 0:32 and 1:08 are throaty, 1:57 and 2:50 are a bit too compressed.

        David Phelps has something happening in the back of his throat, something lifted that makes the sound a bit brighter. It’s resonant though. No, that G#4 is not throat tension. It’s just resonant, who said it’s throaty? 1:22 yes but pretty pushed. 1:30 is supported and well placed but slightly too pushed and 1:33 it’s resonant. 1:57 That’s incorrect, it’s resonant. 2:07 it could be fuller but the studio reverb makes it dubious. 2:28 it’s pretty much strained. 2:44 Park hyoshin is compressing a bit too much and narrowing the back of his throat to be brighter, but I’d still say it’s carrying resonance. 3:03 I hope so, the quality isn’t good. 3:13 and 3:17 yes. 3:40 yes. 3:56 this is tricky cause it’s well placed pushing but it’s high. I’d say there’s more tension than support. 4:23 I don’t hear tongue tension. It’s resonant. 4:36 tbh I take back thinking that G5 was resonant, I was wrong. That was all tight pushing. The G5 had a moment of good placement then it got tight.

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      3. i saw it in jung dongha’s analysis page:
        When comparing his early years to 2012 and 2013, his singing approach had already improvement in his placement, but the throat tension was still quite evident, as heard with the G#4’s in “비상,” A4’s in “정때문에” and Bb4’s in “날 버린 남자.”

        this G#4 is used for throat tension quite evident example. LOL

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      4. I see, sorry about that. I get what I meant. The throat tension was evident in that he wasn’t fully relaxed and was pushing. I thought you meant throaty, but it’s not throaty. It’s really well placed with throat pushing. It’s fairly similar to Sandeul’s Bb4 actually.

        Like

    1. I’m sorry but could you repost your question on Daehyun’s analysis and make it more specific? Cause yes he’s supporting up to a certain note like G4 and then he’s straining after that, so it’s too general of a question and I mean he’s established as a vocalist who supports.

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  24. Hello, I really love your blog ❤ I have some questions about vocals:
    If two people have the same vocal technique (good or weak) but one of them has a wider vocal range, that would mean this person is better than the other? Because vocal range are different from one person to another, right? Someone as Selena Gomez for example could never be at the same range as Beyonce, or could she?
    ….
    When people talk about vocal "power", is it realated to the timbre of voice or the vocal range? I guess it would be the last one, right?
    Thanks for your attention ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Actually it’s very unlikely that people would have the same vocal technique but different vocal ranges because the vocal technique helps expand one’s vocal range and develop it. So with better technique there’s more range to be explored. It’s actually more likely two people could have the same range but different vocal technique levels. Like for an example Jessica and Tamia both have known ranges of D3 ~ G5/G#5 ~ D6, but what differentiates them is the development of their supported ranges. Also power generally means volume. Thank you very much for your love and support! ❤

      Like

      1. Volume has nothing to do with technique right ? I see this as one of the most common misconception , people thought bigger volume / more Powerful automatically the better Vocalist . You should debunk it

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      2. Not necessarily true, although there is a good kind of volume and the not so good kind of volume. Oh you’re right! That’s a very good topic to make a video about, thank you!

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  25. Oi, eu queria saber pra que servem os termos Soprano/Tenor, Mezzo/Barítono e Contralto/Baixo. Eu sempre fico confusa, eles servem pra dizer o timbre de voz de uma pessoa ou o alcance vocal? Ou os dois? As duas coisas estão relacionadas? (timbre e alcance)? Porque eu sempre vejo você por exemplo só de ouvir um trecho de alguém cantando e já dizer o termo ao qual ela se encaixa. Uma pessoa que tem uma voz bem grossa por exemplo pode ser uma soprano?

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    1. O seu tipo de voz é uma característica sua. Ele simplesmente explica onde a sua voz se encontra, onde as suas transições de voz do peito para mista e para cabeça acontecem, e qual é a área mais natural para a sua voz onde ela brilha mais. É como a sua altura, seu peso, sua cor de pele, é só mais um fato físico. Mas não tem a ver com alcance vocal, uma mezzo e uma soprano podem cantar as mesmas notas mas a qualidade é diferente. Sim uma pessoa de voz grossa pode ser uma soprano de voz pesada, o timbre normalmente diz que tipo de soprano que é, não se é soprano ou não.

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      1. Ahmin! Qual é a diferença de um Full Lyric para um Baritone/Mezzo? Tem cantores/vocalistas que parecem ter a voz “grossa” e vocês classificaram como Full e outros como Baritone/Mezzo. O timbre é uma característica particular de cada pessoa, mas o que classificaria exatamente? A “profundidade” e a tessitura? Isso confunde um pouco.

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      2. Bom full lyric é um tipo de soprano ou tenor. Barítono ou mezzo é um tipo de voz diferente. Uma soprano pode ser light lyric, full lyric, dramatic, spinto, coloratura, etc. A tessitura em geral da a percepção de ser mezzo ou soprano, mas o peso e timbre de voz dizem quais são as classificações específicas.

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  26. These are my current singing.
    https://www.smule.com/recording/twice-melting/1340137352_1698123912
    https://www.smule.com/recording/gfriend-%EC%97%AC%EC%9E%90%EC%B9%9C%EA%B5%AC-glass-bead-w-vocal-w-parts/1062600036_1698323717
    => Don’t mention the belt. It’s badly placed and airy. Kinda holding back if there’s a mic in front of me LOL.
    Any noticeable difference from before? I think I’m not as airy as before. What are my problems now?

    Question..
    1. My head voice(?) in Melting (02:29) sounds weird. Is it how an underdeveloped head voice sounds?
    2. Why can’t I use falsetto early? I mean, my falsetto starts from around C5. If I want to use falsetto to sing lower note like G4, I have to slide from C5 to G4, because I don’t have enough agility to get to G4 immediately. But, I can hit notes above C5 without sliding it. But, there’s no use to it, because I won’t sing any higher than A4. Or should I just neglect falsetto and use head voice completely? It’s easier to flip to head voice than falsetto, but it has more limited range, for me. I hit C6 once with falsetto. I’m barely hit C5 with head voice, let alone notes higher than that. I hope this question makes sense.

    Like

    1. Hi there dear. I didn’t mention this before but I shall mention it now. I’d rather hear you sing exercises and show me how you practice your singing, instead of singing songs. There are things I told you that you’re still doing. You’re still singing girl group songs not meant for a baritone voice, you’re still singing in Korean even though it sounds like a language you don’t speak so the diction and your accent get in the way of your openness. I will repeat, don’t sing girl group songs down the octave that are meant to be sung softly within a narrow and generally low range. Don’t sing in Korean if you can’t speak it.

      On a positive note, you are a LOT more confident and comfortable with your voice. You have more of a chest voice now, I can hear you a lot more clearly. Before it sounded like you weren’t really singing much but now I can clearly hear you throughout. Maybe the mic quality is better or maybe you’re just projecting better.

      1. 1:20 you’re going too high at first, it’s not as high as you think. 2:29 this one is actually in pitch, more or less and it sounds more like a head voice. But it’s generally really soft, not connected, not projected and it lacks placement/projection.

      2. So you’re saying that yes you can sing in falsetto on G4 but you can’t do it unless you go higher and then slide down first? That’s actually very common. Most people have issues finding their lower head registers, so it’s easier to start from a higher note first because then you have no choice but to be in head voice and then bring it down through exercises that help you connect and bridge your registers better. You should develop both.

      Like

      1. Yeah, I guess I’m more confident now in front of a mic. No, I’m using the same mic as before. Actually I’m singing loudly like in class or with my family. Weird, I’m afraid to record my singing, but I’m not afraid to sing in public.

        Do I use chesty mix, balanced mix, or heady mix mostly? How about my placement? I try to hum to get the idea of placement until there are kinda like vibrations on my face. But the vibrations happen on my nose. Is that why it’s called ‘nasal resonance’ or do I make a mistake? Nasal resonance = mask resonance right? Just different term to avoid misunderstanding.

        Someone told me to breath like yawning to get the low larynx position. Is it a correct way to breath?
        Thank you for your respond.

        Like

      2. You aren’t really mixing much because you’re not singing high enough, but it’s mostly a chestier mix placed in the throat. When you hum, the vibrations will always be in your nose because your mouth is closed and that’s fine. The key is to get it out of your nose and into your mouth when you open your mouth. Nasal resonance = mask resonance to some people, although I don’t like that term because it can be easily confused with nasality. You shouldn’t yawn fully because then your tongue will be pushed back, you just have the sensation of a lifted soft palate and a lower position larynx as if you were yawning when you breathe in AND when you sing, but make sure the tongue is not rolling back and that it’s relaxed.

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  27. hey! have you heard the cover of yoon jongshin’s 좋니 by suzy?
    honestly i think its pretty bad she can’t really control her voice , has no support and runs out of breath lol it was painful watching her sing
    what do you think?

    Like

    1. I think bad is a really harsh word to use. Her pitch was decent throughout, so that’s good. Her technique is basically closing her throat and being breathy. The lower parts are shallow but relaxed and everything above Bb4 is really tight in the throat, up to C#5. It’s all breathy and it has no volume nor power but her pitch was fine.

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  28. Hello! How did Jungyeon do here and also Tzuyu sounded nice in here, do they support?

    0:21
    1:35 jungyeon
    2:30 tzuyu, ist airy 2:35 jungyeon
    idk much about vocals

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    1. Jungyeon is known to support, so her sounding supported up to Bb4 around 0:21 isn’t news necessarily. 1:35 1:40 D5’s are shouty but the rest are okay. 2:30 Tzuyu relies mostly on a lazy stretch and connection of her vocal cords and a lot of airiness indeed. 2:35 C5 at 2:41 and then some D5’s, those are more shouty and more in her throat.

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    1. Not improving doesn’t have anything to do with choosing style over technique necessarily. Not improving means sticking to your current singing habits and not addressing your shortcomings and so if nothing changes, technique won’t improve. Most vocalists don’t improve, Yuju isn’t a special case of lack of improvement.

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    1. This was asked about when it came out. I actually left a comment ON the video too. But I shall copy-paste:

      “Since literally 5 people have asked about this cover of LOSER so far, I’m just going to watch it, break it down and copy-paste it for each person. There’s some pattern I’m noticing where people are calling Jisoo a better vocalist than Rosé based on this performance and I’d like to know who’s spreading this lie because one person mentioned someone else said that and I wanna know who and where and why.

      0:06 G4 down to whispered A3’s, the melody then goes up to Ab4 at 0:10 then descends down to G3’s. The range of the chorus is basically this G3 ~ Ab4 range, where Rosé has no support in the third octave and is whispering all her low notes without allowing her vocal cords to connect. 0:10 and 0:21 0:24 those Ab4’s are the highest notes in the chorus of the song and there’s no true strain for Rosé, it’s not a note that’s too high for her. She sounds mostly relaxed, her placement is mostly in her nose and her sense of support isn’t strong but this isn’t a challenging range for her and she is using adequate technique to get through the chorus. Her pitch is fine, her placement is nasal and her support is shallow but somewhat present.

      0:49 Jisoo starts singing but she has a lot more breathiness and air escaping her vocal cords, so she overcompensates by compressing her throat muscles a lot more than Rosé. She is singing in a relatively similar range as Rosé, staying within Bb3 ~ Ab4, but she is a lot more closed than Rosé. There is absolutely no breath support being employed when she sings, it’s just throat tension and nasality. She also went flat quite a few times, 0:51 0:58 1:02 where she went up to G4 and Ab4. I wouldn’t say Jisoo can handle singing as high as Rosé, which isn’t high at all for a female, with an approach that’s as relaxed. She’s a lot more closed and I wouldn’t call her G4’s nor Ab4’s relaxed. There isn’t even shallow support, there is no support whatsoever.

      1:55 Rosé also went flat here and at 2:02, and although she is pushing with air more so than she needs to, it’s kind of part of her style. It’s not ideal, but she’s at least more relaxed. 2:14 Lisa sings, there is no support but she is sacrificing a lot less of her health for the sake of style. 2:44 still quite flat for Jisoo, no support whatsoever, her throat is pretty closed. 2:55 Rosé was also flat, not as much but still flat. This song isn’t challenging for any of them, singing like this for Rosé isn’t ideal but it’s not going to hurt her because the range of this song was G3 ~ Bb4, which is slightly over an octave. It’s not a challenging range at all. 3:10 pitchy runs and adlibs for Jisoo, too much air coming through her vocal cords. 3:29 Jennie is a lot more opened than Jisoo and Rosé cause she doesn’t place her sound straight through her nose, but she pushes a lot without supporting and kind of half sing-raps, so honestly there’s no huge gap between her or Rosé, but the difference between them and Jisoo is quite clear.”

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